Love’s Fool(s)

The outcome of Kevin’s battle against Grudja is unclear, but Gigi believes she will pick the winner, regardless.

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As it turns out, Kevin has won, with Grudja’s actions leading to his own demise. While this war is over, the jousting between Gigi and Moya continues. Moreover, further confrontation between Grudja’s men and the McCoy clansmen is averted by Toto, in a funny denouement.

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Everyone but Kevin seems aware of Gigi’s machinations, and they are all on the side of kind-hearted Mistress McCoy. Brett tries to take control of the situation, coercing Toto to help him with his plan. Little does he realize, he is giving aid to the enemy.

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In the July 25th comic, Brett reveals part of Kevin’s origin story. The second and sixth panels show the orphaned Kevin as a boy, with a younger MacTavish Campbell MacGregor, and as a young man, showing valor in battle. Gigi, eavesdropping, is undeterred when Toto describes her perfectly, and in unflattering terms.

The marvelously-scripted sequence continues, and while it seems Kevin’s troubles are over, more peril awaits.

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Coming ten days before Valentine’s Day, the action in the August 1, 1954 comic suits the season grandly. Unfortunately, only Kevin fails to see Gigi’s contriving ways.


For more information on the career of Kreigh Collins, visit his page on Facebook.

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Jinni in a Bottle

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Cowardly Grudja is only willing to battle noble Kevin with the unfair advantage of his new “shooting shield.” At the same time, battle lines are being drawn between the manipulative blonde Gigi, who brashly proclaims that Kevin is hers for the taking. Gigi may be correct in calling Moya a lady, but perhaps she underestimates the fight and determination of her raven-haired counterpart.

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Tension rises in the run-up to the upcoming battle(s). While Kevin trains for his fight with Grudja, Moya is sharpening up, too. Grudja himself shows signs of unease, taking out his wrath on the poor beggar Toto, who has suddenly appeared in Ireland.

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Loyal to the knight who had previously showed him kindness, Toto plays a trick on Grudja’s soldiers. This gives Toto an opportunity to play mind games with the malleable brutes, in an attempt at unsettling them. It also gives Kreigh Collins a chance to use another alternative spelling (Jinni vs. Genie) and to illustrate Toto’s magic trick. Prior to settling on “artist” as a career choice, Collins had been keenly interested in magic. In 1937, he had written and illustrated a book on the subject, “Tricks Toys and Tim, A Book on Model-Making and Magic.” Flap copy for the unique book, published by D. Appleton-Century, reads:

Here is an unusual and fascinating how-to-do-it book, containing original and unhackneyed material. The unique presentation, the clear and understandable directions for making things, and the delightful bits of humor which run through its pages make this a most practical and readable book.

To some extent, these same words can be applied to the comics of Kreigh Collins.

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The July 4, 1954 comic makes clear the differences between Grudja and Kevin (and between Gigi and Moya). The battle begins, but its outcome is clouded. Will good triumph over evil?


For more information on the career of Kreigh Collins, visit his page on Facebook.

New Toy

Even fierce Grudja fears Kevin, but beware, the Norse invader has a new toy. Meanwhile, Kevin, Moya, and her clansmen are under siege.

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Grudja’s counsel has advised him to face Kevin one on one, in public combat. Thus, the Norseman reacts angrily when he learns of Bull Blackie’s actions in pursuit of Kevin. The traitorous Black Irishman has a personal vendetta against the McCoys, but Grudja has other plans to quell these nettlesome Irish resisters.

The May 23 comic is notable for its dramatic twists, varied visual perspectives, Kevin’s very boldness, and to a lesser extent, dated language.

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Making the classic bad guy mistake of letting his prey get away while planning his more appropriate demise, Grudja lets Kevin off the hook. Soon enough, Kevin finds himself in the center of another conflict, as the tenor of the extended sequence shifts.

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A particular aspect of Kreigh Collins’ comics that especially appeals to me is the wonderful throwaway panels that appear whenever the comic ran in a half-page or half-tabloid format. One-third page comics are undoubtably atrocities, suffering from severe cropping, yet even full-page tabloid comics lacked Kreigh’s charming throwaways.

The throwaways’ use was flexible: they could function as visual footnotes, with further explanation of plot device; they could show additional views of a comic’s scenery; or they presented another opportunity to show a pretty girl. In some cases the information in the “visual footnotes” could be recycled — with an adjustment for inflation, if necessary. (Note the difference in a suit of armor’s value between 1954 and 1962!)

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(You remember the story behind that armor of Kevin’s, don’t you?)

 


For more information on the career of Kreigh Collins, visit his page on Facebook.

Grudja

KTB 041154 panel 150 QCCKevin is excited to return to Ireland, and especially so to return to Castle McCoy. After a long absence, he misses much about his homeland. Longing to settle down, imagining a peaceful life as a farmer, Kevin’s high hopes for a joyful reunion are quickly dashed. Evil Grudja is menacing Ireland, and at his side is none other than Bull Blackie, the villain in the inaugural sequence of “Kevin the Bold.”

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With Bull Blackie on her trail, Moya escapes, her beauty belying her ferocity. To her horror, Moya is shocked to realize the man she has knocked cold is her champion, Kevin. However, Moya is not the only one who will be startled by the reappearance of the legendary knight.

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Despite the effects of his nasty knock on the head, Kevin’s primal instincts kick in. So do those of Kevin’s creator, as the sequence continues with more beautifully drawn comics and a plot line with multiple dramatic arcs.

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For more information on the career of Kreigh Collins, visit his page on Facebook.

Toto

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On April 4, 1954, a new adventure began for Kevin. It featured characters old and new, with battles between Kevin and Norse sea raiders, and between two beautiful women vying for Kevin’s attention. Besides serving as historical fiction and name dropping people and events of the times, the sequence featured examples of one of Kreigh Collins’ hallmarks: illustrated and labelled examples of 15th-century tools and technology. It also revealed more of Kevin’s shrouded back story.

En route to Cagnes on the French Riviera, Kevin encounters Toto in northern Italy. Their meeting is brief, but before parting, the clownish trickster tells Kevin’s fortune. He sees danger ahead, which should come as no surprise to either Kevin or the seasoned Sunday comics reader.

Two points if anyone has heard of Till Eulenspiegel or François Villon.

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The “Australian Edition” comic book featuring this sequence used the splash panel from the April 11 strip for its cover, and as usual, redrew it to better serve the new format.

Upon being reunited with his ward, Kevin learns that Brett also seems able to predict the future. Little does Brett realize how necessary Kevin’s weapons will become.


For more information on the career of Kreigh Collins, please visit his page on Facebook.

Happy New Year

Growing up, I thought including a holiday recap letter with one’s Christmas card was a new phenomena. I also found most of these holiday messages a bit tedious and self-serving. It turns out that year-end letters weren’t a new concept, but an old tradition, and like many things, the old versions seem better than those from the present.

Kreigh Collins generally wrote his family’s holiday letters, and one could generally tell if he had also typed them up by noting any misspellings (Kreigh was a notoriously poor speller). Throughout his career, his wife Therese (Teddy) served as his secretary and editor, as well as his model and muse. The Collins family’s holiday letters had the added bonus of Kreigh’s illustrations, and included some interesting details in the life of the well-travelled family from Ada, Michigan.

The examples I have start in 1964, and the earliest one is my favorite, as yours truly received top billing.

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The letters also betray a bit of Kreigh’s growing weariness, as his career wound down as the 1970s approached. “Kevin the Bold” never did appear on TV—instead the strip transitioned into “Up Anchor!”—and the family’s sailboat and home away from home, Heather, was sold.

A couple of the letters are missing from my collection (1967, 1970, 1971), and the final one (1972) was written by Teddy. The letter itself was jettisoned, as the Christmas card incorporated the holiday message, and the whole process became simplified.

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For 2018, to both my far-flung readers and those closer to home, I am wishing good health and all the best in the new year. Personally, I hope the new year results in the publication of my “Mitzi McCoy” book, so long in the works (I began scanning the comics nearly five years ago). For any potential readers, I appreciate your patience.

May your dreams also come true this year.

Sincerely, “Muscles”

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For more information on the career of Kreigh Collins, please visit his page on Facebook.

The Greatest Story Ever Told

Kreigh Collins’ version of the Christmas Story, illustrated in comics form, was hailed upon its release. Locally, it was featured as part of a Christmas exhibit at the Ryerson Library in downtown Grand Rapids, Michigan, and the event made the December 13, 1949 edition of the Grand Rapids Press. Today, the bulk of Kreigh Collins’ papers and comics illustrations are found in a collection at the Grand Rapids Public Library’s Local History Department, housed in the Ryerson building.

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The final instalment of the series is another beautiful reproduction of Collins’ work by the Chicago Tribune. After seeing the initial results of the Trib’s pressmen, the artist showed his appreciation in a letter to A. M. Kennedy, the comics editor for the esteemed paper. No doubt Collins was sincere, but perhaps he was hoping a little praise would help his chances of seeing his regular comic, “Mitzi McCoy,” also grace its pages.

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While “Mitzi” never did make it into the Trib, the Kreigh Collins was successful in crafting a comic (“Kevin the Bold”) that did appeal to A. M. Kennedy and would appear in the Chicago paper within a year.

Merry Christmas!

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For more information on the career of Kreigh Collins, please visit his page on Facebook.

Fan Mail

Kreigh Collins’ “Christmas Story” initially impressed newspaper editors during its sales phase, and once it was published it impressed the general public. The fourth instalment is another wonderful piece of storytelling, and this time, Stub and Dick Dixon appear more often than in the previous three episodes.

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As was the case during his career as a cartoonist, Kreigh Collins received plenty of mail from readers — positive, negative, and punctilious. One piece of feedback he received caught his attention. In this case, the letter was forwarded to Kreigh from the Chicago Tribune’s office. A reader from Minneapolis offered cautious praise for the first instalment, but took issue with a detail in Collins’ illustration — the saddle of the courier in the first comic’s panel (shown below).

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The reader noted that “according to reliable historians saddles had not been invented until six centuries later.” No doubt Collins bristled, given the countless hours he spent on research, and the fact that he was desperate to impress the executives at the Trib, as he pushed for them to pick up “Mitzi McCoy,” and continue running his work. Kreigh’s response was a classic. He praised the reader while not admitting a mistake, and in a cc to the Trib’s managing editor, tosses off a hillarious encapsulation of himself.

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It’s typical of his wit, and is an expression that I look forward to repeating one day.


For more information on the career of Kreigh Collins, please visit his page on Facebook.

In Advent

In the autumn of 1949, things were looking rosy for the Kreigh Collins and the NEA. Newspapers that already carried “MItzi McCoy” were praising the upcoming nativity sequence. Fred Ferguson, of the New York Sunday Mirror gushed,  “The MITZI McCOY Christmas Story presentation is certainly a magnificent job. Gosh, but that boy can draw. The stuff is beautiful all the way through and here’s hoping that the sales response justifies all of Collins’ painstaking efforts. The story is also darn well done.”

The NEA’s salesmen were busy knocking on the doors of prospective targets — newspapers that didn’t yet carry “MItzi McCoy” and who might pick up “The Christmas Story” or start running “Mitzi” itself. The first sale was made when the Memphis Commercial-Appeal broke the ice. Several other newspapers would follow, including the Chicago Tribune.

The NEA made a run at a couple of newspapers close to Collins’ homestead in Ada, Michigan — The Grand Rapids Press and the Detroit News. While both papers’ general managers expressed interest in the series, they passed. (The following year, the Press started running “Mitzi” and the News began featuring Collins’ “Kevin the Bold” in 1951).

These days, Christmas preparations seem to come too early, with stores getting decked out for the yuletide season before Thanksgiving has passed. Things were less commercialized in the late 1940s, and the appearance in Advent of a Christmas feature was surely welcome, especially for children, for whom Christmas was the highlight of their year.

Without further ado, here is the third insalment, from 68 years ago today.

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For more information on the career of Kreigh Collins, please visit his page on Facebook.

The Christmas Story in Pictures

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Last week, I forgot to post an accompanying Tribune promotional ad (above) heralding the appearance of its new comic. Not easily overlooked, it is page-high and spans several columns. Somehow I managed. As far as the bit about “internationally famous artist celebrated for his interpretations of Bible stories and personalities,” examples can be found in previous posts on this blog. While “Internationally famous” may have been a bit of a stretch (by the end of 1949, “Mitzi McCoy” had at least appeared in several Canadian papers, in pre-Castro Havana, Cuba’s El Sol, and a Parisian Paper), there is no disputing the acclaim mentioned about Collins’ religious work — Nashville, Tennessee’s Methodist Publishing House published Collins’ “Bible Stories Comics” for five years in the mid-1940s.

Below, the second week’s promotional push: a spot ad and another 24″-tall multiple-column ad. A detail that I especially like is my grandmother’s handwritten dates on the clippings. While my grandfather died young, at  66, his wife Therese (who was Kreigh’s senior) lived to be nearly 102. Among other roles, “Teddy” served as Kreigh’s secretary, muse, model and collaborator, and she delighted everyone she met.

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And finally, here is “tomorrow’s” comic, originally in print 68 years ago today.

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For more information on the career of Kreigh Collins, please visit his page on Facebook.